Aromatherapy Massage

Aromatherapy Massage

What is aromatherapy massage?

Aromatherapy massage is massage therapy but with highly concentrated plant oils, called essential oils, added to the massage oil or lotion.

How does aromatherapy massage work?

The nostrils are attached to a part of the brain called the limbic system. The limbic system controls emotions and influences the nervous system and hormones.

When you inhale essential oil molecules, messages are transmitted to the limbic system and affect heart rate, stress level, blood pressure, breathing, memory, digestion, and the immune system.

Essential oils are also believed to be absorbed through the skin.

Each essential oil has different healing properties. For example, some calm while others energize. Here are some widely used essential oils and their properties:

  • calming – chamomile, lavender, geranium
  • uplifting – ylang ylang, clary sage, rose, neroli
  • energizing – rosemary
  • cleansing – rosemary
  • decongesting – eucalyptus, pine, tea tree

Why do people get aromatherapy massage?

Aromatherapy massage is particularly suited to conditions involving stress or improving emotionally-related conditions.

  • Stress and stress-related conditions such as insomnia
  • Headache
  • Digestive disorders
  • Premenstrual syndrome (PMS)
  • Back pain

Price

$100 / 1hr

Here is a few examples of the research that is being done on aromatherapy massage:

  • Self-massage significantly improved symptoms and wellbeing in people with lymphedema. It also slightly, but not significantly reduced limb volume. However, carefully chosen aromatherapy oils did not appear to be more effective than massage without aromatherapy oils.
  • Sixteen first-time mothers received a 30-minute aromatherapy massage two days after delivery, while 20 mothers received standard post-partum care. The aromatherapy massage group had significantly decreased ratings of post-partum blues and anxiety and had increased vigor and attachment to their babies.
  • Research suggests that patients with cancer, particularly in the palliative care setting, are increasingly using aromatherapy and massage.